Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards

The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards were introduced in 2009 in a bid to protect people’s human rights.  In particular, they were introduced to plug the cap that was left where people weren’t eligible to be detained under the Mental Health Act but needed to be detained (sometimes against their wishes) in a care home or hospital.  Since 2014, people’s awareness of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards has increased following a Supreme Court ruling that significantly reduced the threshold of who is considered to be deprived of their liberty.

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What Are Mental Capacity Assessments?

Mental capacity is the ability to make decisions.  Whether large or small, we all make many decisions each day, often without being fully aware of what decisions we’re making.  Sometimes we pride ourselves on a good decision, other times we regret what we have done.  However, for some people, the ability to make decisions becomes impaired (either temporarily or permanently) which may be due to an injury or condition such as dementia or learning disabilities.

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What is Corporate Law

What is Corporate Law

Corporate law is a branch of law that deals with issues and disputes relating to corporations and other businesses. Because a corporation is regarded as a single entity by the law, corporate law involves the organisations themselves, rather than the individuals who run or work for them. This gives corporations a unique kind of status within the law, as the organisation is considered to be distinct from its shareholders, owners, and directors.

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What is Residential Conveyancing?

Residential conveyancing is the legal process by which a property is sold by one person and bought by another. This process often involves a solicitor, because most mortgage lenders require that a home buyer is represented by a solicitor when they buy a home using a mortgage. For anyone buying or selling a residential property, it’s hugely useful to involve a solicitor to deal with the legal processes involved, especially if it’s your first time as a buyer or seller.

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What is a Barrister?

What is a Barrister?

A barrister is a type of lawyer who spends most of their time on matters relating to court or tribunal cases. As barristers usually focus on matters relating to court processes, so they are far more likely to work on complex or high-profile cases.

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How does the Divorce Process Work?

When two people are married, their affairs are legally bound together. This means that in order to effect a complete separation, a second legal process—divorce—is required. When a marriage breaks down irreparably, divorce is the most common end result. Getting a divorce doesn’t usually require that the couple go to court, but often both parties benefit from legal advice when dividing property and arranging custody of children. After recently requiring the services of a divorce solicitor in london (who was really helpful) I decided to provide an article on the process and the steps that people often have to go through.

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What is Immigration Law?

Immigration law deals with the legal entry of people from other countries into the UK. The governing body that decides who can enter the country is UK Visas and Immigration.

The requirements that someone needs to meet to enter the country differ depending on several factors, including their reason for entering, how long they intend to stay, and sometimes their job, personal wealth, and family status.

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Just Getting Started!

So the website is a little empty of posts at the moment but I plan to add lots of posts related to law with a focus on the UK.

Please check back in a few weeks from the date of this post when I am hopeful that there will be something much more interesting for you to read!

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